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Masterclass: Through the eyes of a Nobel Laureate

Professor Barry Marshall and Emeritus Professor J Robin Warren were awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease. Today, Professor Marshall is the Director of The Marshall Centre for Infectious Diseases Research and Training, founded in his honour.

In addition to Helicobacter pylori research, the Marshall Centre is at the forefront of infectious disease identification and surveillance, diagnostics and drug design, and transformative discovery.

His research has expanded with this group to embrace new technologies including next generation sequencing, and genomic analysis. He recently developed a novel approach for diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders through artificial intelligence and analysis of bowel sounds.

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Infectious disease is a growing concern for our planet. Join me as I shine a light on infectious disease research.

Nobel Laureate, Professor Barry Marshall, Director, The Marshall Centre for Infectious Diseases Research & Training, The University of Western Australia.

Video: 24 minutes 45 seconds

About the academic presenter

Nobel Laureate, Professor Barry Marshall, Director, The Marshall Centre for Infectious Diseases Research & Training, The University of Western Australia

Professor Barry Marshall is a Nobel Laureate and Professor of Clinical Microbiology at The University of Western Australia (UWA). Today, Professor Marshall is the Director of The Marshall Centre for Infectious Diseases Research and Training which was founded in his honour.

Professor Marshall (UWA graduate-class of ’74), and Emeritus Professor J Robin Warren were awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of the bacterium Helicobacter pylori and its role in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

Professor Marshall returned to Perth and UWA in 1996 after a tenure at the University of Virginia. In 1998 Marshall was made a Fellow of the Royal Society. In 2008 he was elected a Foreign Member of the prestigious US National Academy of Science, an institution established in 1863 by US President Abraham Lincoln.