Full-time, part-time and casual work

As an employee in Australia, you could be hired as a full-time, part-time or casual, and have varying pay rates, hours of work and entitlements.

Many international students seek part-time or casual work while they study in Australia.

The extra spending money to support your living experience can help you discover this wonderful country and meet other students in your local community. It's also a great way to build your confidence and make new friends.

While there are benefits to having employment while you study, there are two things you must do:

  1. Make sure you have enough time to balance your studies, job and your wellbeing.
  2. Check your visa status to ensure you are eligible to work whilst studying.

Checking your visa status

Australian student visa holders are eligible to work a maximum of 40 hours per fortnight during their study.

To check your visa rules, visit the Department of Home Affairs website.

Where to look to find a job

In Australia, the best way to look for part-time or casual work are through:

International students have access to the same workplace protections as all Australian employees and are entitled to safe and fair workplaces.

Here's what you should know about working in Australia (PDF 447.6KB) before you arrive.

What are the differences between full-time, part-time and casual work?

In Australia, an employee could be hired in a full-time, part-time or casual role. Each of these types of employment have varying pay rates, hours of work and entitlements.

Full-time employees

As a full-time Australian employee, you would:

  • Work, on average, 38 hours each week.
  • Be a permanent employee or have a fixed-term contract.
  • Be entitled to paid leave including annual leave and sick/carer’s leave.
  • Be entitled to a written notice if an employer terminates a contract.

Part-time employees

As a part-time employee, you would:

  • Work, on average, less than 38 hours per week.
  • Work regular hours each week.
  • Be a permanent employee or have a fixed-term contract.
  • Be entitled to paid leave including annual leave and sick/carer’s leave.
  • Be entitled to a written notice if an employer terminates a contract.

Casual employees:

As a casual employee, you would:

  • Have accepted an offer for a job knowing there is no firm advance commitment to ongoing work.

 

For an overview of each type of employment and its entitlements, visit the Fair Work Ombudsman website.

Rate this page

  • Rate as Helpful3 Helpful votes
  • Rate as Not helpful0 Not helpful votes